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Orion laser facility

Orion is one of the most powerful lasers and largest laser facilities in the UK.

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AWE scientists inspire the next generation

 

 Around 90 children took part in three experiments at St Finian’s Primary School, Cold Ash, designed to illustrate how diverse and fun science can be.

The session took place in support of British Science Week (BSW), a ten-day celebration of science, technology, engineering and maths, March 11-20, featuring fascinating, entertaining and engaging events and activities across the UK for people of all ages.

During a half-day series of science classes, staff from AWE presented interactive demonstrations to three groups of year four, five and six pupils.

Experiments included illustrating how pressure works, how oxygen effects fire and a demo on the properties of liquids.

Year four teacher from St Finians said: “The thing we liked was that we had a scientist actually with the children, it developed a sense of awe and wonder. It was great for the children to use 'proper' things like equipment and chemicals and they felt like 'proper' scientists. The visiting scientists took time teaching the concepts children weren't familiar with and the experiments certainly helped their scientific skills in prediction and drawing conclusions.”

Year six teacher from St Finians said: “The links to Tim Peake and his Space Mission added additional excitement for the children and they were delighted to explore vacuums and their applications. It was fantastic to see a female scientist and she was inspirational to the girls in the school, enthusing them with her obvious passion for science. The cross curricular links, such as maths, added additional meaning and context for the children's learning.”

AWE Engineer David Watts who took part in the science day said: “It was fantastic to see so many children engaging and enjoying the day, I know some of the children and to see them amazed by what science can offer was a pleasure. AWE works actively with local schools to foster and inspire an interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics subjects. One of the teachers told me that to see actual scientists in the school showing children and explaining science was fantastic.”

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