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AWE searches for Young Scientist of the Year

The Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) has launched a competition to find the AWE Young Scientist of the Year 2016.

AWE has a thriving outreach programme with local schools and regularly hosts Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) events to enthuse pupils to enjoy the subjects.

In 2015 AWE launched the AWEsome Education Zone, a free online resource to support local schools.

With the launch of the 2016 Young Scientist of the Year competition AWE is continuing to foster and inspire an interest in science.

Launching the competition, Prof Andrew Randewich, AWE Chief Scientist and a competition judge, said: “AWE hopes that this competition will spark an interest in science among pupils across Berkshire and Hampshire. Inspirational teachers are the key to encouraging pupils into science and you can’t start too early, so this means key stages 1, 2 and 3.  At AWE we try to inspire pupils by showing them just how exciting science can be. I think if we encourage younger pupils then we have a chance of getting them hooked on the subject. I look forward to judging the entries. Good luck to all those who enter.”

The competition is open for entries from schools within Hampshire and Berkshire. Students who enter the competition will have to show they have excelled in a science field and ideally show enthusiasm in the subject both inside and outside of the school day, including projects, school clubs, etc. They may have achieved outstanding results or just have the determination and drive to excel in science. Teachers may only nominate one student who must be in Year 9 in September 2016.

All the finalists will be given an award for outstanding achievement in science. For the overall winner, as well as receiving the coveted AWE Young Scientist of the Year 2016 trophy they and their teacher will have the opportunity to attend theprestigious Royal Institute (RI) Christmas Lectures in London.

Teachers are asked to download and submit an application form, which includes a personal statement from the student answering three questions;

1. What Science means to me (100 words)

2. Who is your most inspiring scientist and why? (100 words)

3. If you could use science to do anything at all what would it be? (100 words)

The teacher will need to complete the form including the reasons why this student has been nominated (in no more than 300 words and in line with the nomination criteria ).

 

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